Rochester Spared but Guildford Burns.

Saxon Times Review November 1066

Get an insight into 1066 and experience the Norman Conquest through the eyes of the Saxon Times reporters. For all the stories behind the headlines read the Saxon Times.

65 13 Nov Advert Varengian Guard v4

Rochester Spared but Guildford Burns

Queen Edith pledges support for Duke William and Winchester is saved

Today, Duke William sent word to Winchester, held in dower by Edith, widow of King Edward, with a demand that they pay tribute.

It was revealed in a statement from the Duke’s camp that he “considered it would be dishonourable if he went to take away the seat thus granted her and he asked for only an impost and a pledge”. This had already been agreed with the Queen’s advisers and the town council the night before. It was to be a token that safeguarded Winchester and secured the Treasury for Duke William.

The Norman War Machine moves on to Reading and Wallingford.

The army has orders to waste the countryside partly for food and partly retribution against Saxon Wessex. At Wallingford they are to make camp and wait for the Duke at the head of the enlarged Second Division

Empire To Last For Thousand Years

I listened as Duke William gave a rousing and impromptu speech from his saddle:

“Prepare yourself for the battles ahead for you will be part of a new model army that will, if necessary subdue this nation by force. We will create a Norman Empire that will stretch across Europe and last for a thousand years. We have already made great inroads in Sicily and Southern Italy and soon England will fall.

You will cherish this moment forever and soon you will take your share of our glorious inheritance”.

It was met with enthusiastic cheers but they were soon quietened as the Duke impressed upon them the need to first take Mass as befitted a Holy Army marching under the Papal Banner.

Such lies and duplicity! But the propaganda that is broadcast as part of the Duke’s war machine is readily absorbed by those with avarice and greed all too evident.

 

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William to be crowned King by Christmas

Issue 36

Normans Are Ready

William, Duke of Normandy and his Council of War are delighted by the intelligence received from their spies.

There is a belief that in Harold’s haste, some of the army may have been left behind to recover from the long march from York and will follow on later.

By contrast, William’s army seem well rested in their long established safe haven, at Hastings, and are ready for a fight. They had been dreading a long, drawn-out campaign and believe a swift engagement will be to their advantage.

The Norman army is getting ready to move from the security of Hastings and Hastings Castle to a new camp on Telham Hill, seven miles to the north.

My informants tell me of Duke William’s intention to meet Harold’s army close to the crossroads at Senlac Hill.

Sources close to the Duke admit that these strategic crossroads hold the key to the invasion.

Win here and William could be crowned King by Christmas.

Comment

I fear for England and our Saxon Rights and our Rule of Law. We must not submit to Norman dictatorship.

It will not be benevolent. We will be forced from our lands. Our lives will be controlled by fear and uncertainty. Taxation will destroy our way of life.

French will become our language. It is not the future that we want for our sons

Trust me.

This issue of The Saxon Times is included in the 1066 Saxon Times Resource book:

www.1066thesaxontimes.com

A Most Enjoyable Read

Cover V2

“A most enjoyable read and will be of great interest to those pupils studying history.”

Yvette Gunther,

Librarian,

Nottingham High School

 

“Thank you for The Saxon Times, such fun and very informative and interesting and great for history teachers at both Secondary and primary level, using extracts for ideas and introductory work.”

Shirley W.

The Saxon Times

A Look at how the events of 1066 may have been reported by an English newspaper – with a little interference from the Normans

This book takes a novel and very different look at the tumultuous events of the Norman Conquest of England in 1066.

Instead of being written as history, the book takes the form of a series of facsimile pages from a contemporary newspaper reporting on events as they unfolded and appeared to contemporary people.

When King Edward the Confessor died in January 1066 nobody can have foreseen the year of bloodshed and mayhem that would take place. Everything seemed settled and peaceful.

But very soon it became obvious that greedy, envious foreign eyes were being cast toward England. Invasion was not far off.

Follow what happened through the pages of the Saxon Times, a uniquely English look at what happened in that momentous year through the ‘eye-witnesses’ reports of the Saxon Times reporters.