YOU CAN PULL THE WOOL OVER THE EYES OF THE PEOPLE.

1066 The Saxon Times

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COUNCIL OF ROUEN 2nd February 1066

The Duke summoned his chief magnates to a council at Rouen with the intention of outlining his plans and drumming up support for a Norman invasion of England.

The reception to his war plans was chilly to say the least, ‘an unimpressive presentation that failed to address how the money would be raised for such an enormous venture’ said one Earl. ‘It’s fine riding off across country to besiege a castle but overseas is something else and there are more like me that feel the same’.

YOU CAN PULL THE WOOL OVER THE EYES OF THE PEOPLE.

‘Easily led, fickle, no spine’ were just some of the comments that were heard on the streets of Rouen that night. ‘Dragging the common man into another war just so that the rich can line their pockets even more. It’s us that has to do the real fighting’ was heard more than once. The mood was sombre after the decision of the Council was read out from the steps of the Cathedral.

A DECLARATION OF WAR

“It is the decision of The Council of Rouen that as from today, we are at war with England.”

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Normans Rebuffed at Gates of London

The Valiant Battle of Southwark

It was a valiant effort that much cheered the volunteers atop the city walls.

Issue 51

Duke William may have hoped to seize the city by surprise, or it may have just been a diversionary tactic but in the aftermath of the so called “Battle of Southwark” the heinous Normans, true to form, sacked and burnt Southwark.

By the morning, the fires had died and the Normans had gone.

This excerpt is taken from the pages of The Saxon Times, Newspaper of the Year, 1066 and is included in The Saxon Times Resource book of downloadable resources.

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Duke William’s ‘Grand Invasion of England’

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Travel News

THERE are likely to be severe delays on all roads in the southeast, for the next three months, as Duke William continues his invasion of England. The official advice is to postpone your travel arrangements unless it is absolutely necessary as all travel is likely to prove dangerous to your well-being.

Hastings.

The news from Duke William’s advisers is that he expected the homage of the English Witan but this submission has not arrived, and that piques – one in the Norman eye for William.

William of Poitiers, his chronicler, was heard to say “When he found that they would not come to him, he decided to use all the force that was left in Hastings and that which would come to him from over sea, to ravage all the country that he overran.”

First Division The Main Army

The First Division will form the main Norman Army and march first north to Senlac Hill and then will follow the ancient trackways and Roman roads east towards Dover before moving on to Canterbury.

It is a circuitous route as it must avoid the Appledore Estuary, that great inland sea that stretches almost all the way to Tenterden. The objective is to secure Dover and start the building of a Castle before moving off towards Canterbury.

I have it on good authority that it is the Duke’s intention to negotiate the surrender of Canterbury, safeguarding the Cathedral where he intends to pray for redemption and the blessing of the remainder of the campaign.

Second Division

The Second Division will leave Hastings and march west to the great harbour at Portchester, at the head of Fareham Creek. Their orders are to seize the Royal Mints at Steyning, Arundel

and Chichester, survey and list sites for fortification that will secure Duke William’s control of Wessex that was once the stronghold of Harold Godwinson.

Barons such as William de Warenne also see it as an opportunity for personal gain, identifying lands that that they will petition the Duke for once he becomes King. With the prospect of rich pickings further west they begin to look and strut like Norman invaders and are eager to leave the confines of Hastings.

Once at Fareham Creek, they are to rendezvous with reinforcements sailing from France and Normandy. After a period of assimilation, the enlarged Division is to move north towards Winchester, making camp at Alresford and wait for further instruction from the Duke William himself.

It is stressed very forcibly, that they must not make any move on Winchester itself.

For the stories behind the headlines and the latest news on Duke William’s ‘Invasion of England’ read The Saxon Times.

The 1066 Saxon Times Resource book is a compendium of all the leading stories of 1066 available as a downloadable and photocopiable classroom resources, including quizzes to test your knowledge, and is available from The Saxon Times and TES.

 

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1066, A Tumultuous Year

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Now available as ‘The 1066 Saxon Times Resource Book’ with 67 downloadable classroom resources covering the whole year from the Consecration of West Minster Abbey to New Year’s Eve 1066 when Duke William can be found hiding in a nunnery in Barking!

The 1066 Saxon Times Resource book is available as a downloadable and photocopiable classroom resource, including quizzes to test your knowledge,

and is available from The Saxon Times and TES.

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Saxons Count Cost Of Joining Europe

Issue 40

Norman Lies

God came in peace and Bishop Odo’s reliance on the Pope’s Blessing is hypocritical at the very least.

It is really all to do with power, the power of the Church and the power of Duke William. Both see the opportunity for riches and wealth. I’ve already heard the nobles carving up lands for themselves and looting and murder are all part of their game. No doubt they hope to buy their forgiveness, in the eyes of the Lord, by making large donations to the Church.

There is no such thing as Norman goodwill.

All Are Dead

After the terrible events of the Battle of Senlac Hill, when the ‘flower of English nobility and youth lay dead’, the Norman Army spent yesterday scouring the battle field.

If any Saxon was still alive it was a miracle, but they would not be long for this world. The murderous Normans made sure that no Saxon should ‘suffer’ a lingering death.

 

This issue of The Saxon Times is included in the 1066 Saxon Times Resource book:

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