Closer ties with Denmark?

Sweyn

By March, the ‘Treacherous Tostig’ had sailed all that way to Denmark and on to Viborg, just for King Sweyn to tell him no.

‘I don’t want to turn against Harold, he’s family too. I’d rather fight side by side with him, against that Viking William, then support any of your ill thought out proposed invasion plans. You’ll get no help here.’

AN INTERVIEW WITH ONE OF KING HAROLD’S CLOSEST ADVISORS

Last night our Royal Reporter was able to capture this insight into a political strategy that may help England’s cause. Speaking anonymously, a noble Lord said:

“If I had my way, Harold would be sending out emissaries to Denmark and building up his family ties abroad. They’d send an army to help and it might stop William if we could show a united front. Those Vikings from Norway have been trouble for the last 250 years, looting, burning and pillaging, and everything else too. William’s got Viking blood and he’s just the same. We need to stop him at source, turn his people against him. Sometimes, the King is so stubborn he won’t listen to any advice, good or bad.”

It’s an interesting viewpoint and one that makes some sense but will King Harold take heed?

FITZOSBERN THROWS DOWN THE GAUNTLET

After spring begins, William summons another war council to meet at Lillebonne and they begin to draw up the invasion plans. FitzOsbern, Lord of Breteuil, announced that “I’ll furnish forty ships, manned, equipped and provisioned, who of you will be brave enough to follow my lead”. The gauntlet was thrown down to the assembled nobles, challenging their loyalty to great effect. The first battle was won.

Following the reports from Normandy, the talk on the streets of London dismisses William as delusional and paranoid. “He’s just like a spoilt child” one said. “Stamps his feet and throws a tantrum just like my four year old but my wife gives in to him and he gets what he wants in the end, the same as William”. Another said “It’s all because he didn’t get England. He’s just evil but we can’t get his people to see that, he’s got such a good propaganda machine that they all believe him – even that Pope chap in Rome.”

For the full report behind these headlines and the reports, read 1066 The Saxon Times and experience the Norman Conquest through the eyes of the Saxon Times reporters.

For more information on The Saxon Times visit: www.1066thesaxontimes.com/home

 

It Is The ‘Work Of The Devil’

Special Edition: Science Extra

Work of the Devil

They Call It ‘Printing’!

Pilgrims from overseas, who have visited Winchester to sit at the tomb of St Swithun, have revealed some extraordinary tales from mysterious eastern lands.

Discounted by clergy as the work of the devil, it appears possible to create books many times over in “a blink of the eye”’ according to one report, and “without the use of pens”.

It has been incredulously greeted by many monks who fear for their future as illuminating manuscripts is their sole mission in life. “What will happen to me” said one monk who wished not to be named, “I’ve trained years for this job and it’s all I know. If it’s true and they bring those infernal machines to England it will change the way the church works and not for the better. Mark my words, those devil machines will have to go. Progress my foot, what about the rights of the workers”

I catch up with one of the pilgrims, Brother Osmund, and whilst he confirms the rumours he admits that the story is at least third hand. He heard it from a friend of a friend of a friend, so to speak, who had ventured east by boat from Byzantium.

Brother Osmund recounts this tale.

“In a land far away to the east, beyond belief, there is a world that has invented the ability to produce many copies of the same book. This country is known as China and they have called what they do ‘Printing’.

They have carved wooden blocks of letters and words and have a machine that once the characters are inked, presses the blocks onto paper and then rubs the back of the paper. It is truly amazing.”

“They’ve printed many copies of their religious writings, 5000 scrolls each. Just think what we could do with the Bible. If people could read, they could read the Bible themselves. It would be a whole new world. We could spread the word far and wide. Everybody will share in the Holy Trinity”.

For the full report behind these headlines and the reports, read 1066 The Saxon Times and experience the Norman Conquest through the eyes of the Saxon Times reporters

For more information on The Saxon Times visit: www.1066thesaxontimes.com/home

YOU CAN PULL THE WOOL OVER THE EYES OF THE PEOPLE.

1066 The Saxon Times

blog-william.jpg

COUNCIL OF ROUEN 2nd February 1066

The Duke summoned his chief magnates to a council at Rouen with the intention of outlining his plans and drumming up support for a Norman invasion of England.

The reception to his war plans was chilly to say the least, ‘an unimpressive presentation that failed to address how the money would be raised for such an enormous venture’ said one Earl. ‘It’s fine riding off across country to besiege a castle but overseas is something else and there are more like me that feel the same’.

YOU CAN PULL THE WOOL OVER THE EYES OF THE PEOPLE.

‘Easily led, fickle, no spine’ were just some of the comments that were heard on the streets of Rouen that night. ‘Dragging the common man into another war just so that the rich can line their pockets even more. It’s us that has to do the real fighting’ was heard more than once. The mood was sombre after the decision of the Council was read out from the steps of the Cathedral.

A DECLARATION OF WAR

“It is the decision of The Council of Rouen that as from today, we are at war with England.”

For all the stories behind the headlines, read 1066 The Saxon Times and experience the Norman Conquest through the eyes of the Saxon Times reporters

For more information on The Saxon Times visit:          1066 Harold’s Way

Normans Rebuffed at Gates of London

The Valiant Battle of Southwark

It was a valiant effort that much cheered the volunteers atop the city walls.

Issue 51

Duke William may have hoped to seize the city by surprise, or it may have just been a diversionary tactic but in the aftermath of the so called “Battle of Southwark” the heinous Normans, true to form, sacked and burnt Southwark.

By the morning, the fires had died and the Normans had gone.

This excerpt is taken from the pages of The Saxon Times, Newspaper of the Year, 1066 and is included in The Saxon Times Resource book of downloadable resources.

www.1066thesaxontimes.com

Duke William’s ‘Grand Invasion of England’

x La Bataille v4 symphony

Travel News

THERE are likely to be severe delays on all roads in the southeast, for the next three months, as Duke William continues his invasion of England. The official advice is to postpone your travel arrangements unless it is absolutely necessary as all travel is likely to prove dangerous to your well-being.

Hastings.

The news from Duke William’s advisers is that he expected the homage of the English Witan but this submission has not arrived, and that piques – one in the Norman eye for William.

William of Poitiers, his chronicler, was heard to say “When he found that they would not come to him, he decided to use all the force that was left in Hastings and that which would come to him from over sea, to ravage all the country that he overran.”

First Division The Main Army

The First Division will form the main Norman Army and march first north to Senlac Hill and then will follow the ancient trackways and Roman roads east towards Dover before moving on to Canterbury.

It is a circuitous route as it must avoid the Appledore Estuary, that great inland sea that stretches almost all the way to Tenterden. The objective is to secure Dover and start the building of a Castle before moving off towards Canterbury.

I have it on good authority that it is the Duke’s intention to negotiate the surrender of Canterbury, safeguarding the Cathedral where he intends to pray for redemption and the blessing of the remainder of the campaign.

Second Division

The Second Division will leave Hastings and march west to the great harbour at Portchester, at the head of Fareham Creek. Their orders are to seize the Royal Mints at Steyning, Arundel

and Chichester, survey and list sites for fortification that will secure Duke William’s control of Wessex that was once the stronghold of Harold Godwinson.

Barons such as William de Warenne also see it as an opportunity for personal gain, identifying lands that that they will petition the Duke for once he becomes King. With the prospect of rich pickings further west they begin to look and strut like Norman invaders and are eager to leave the confines of Hastings.

Once at Fareham Creek, they are to rendezvous with reinforcements sailing from France and Normandy. After a period of assimilation, the enlarged Division is to move north towards Winchester, making camp at Alresford and wait for further instruction from the Duke William himself.

It is stressed very forcibly, that they must not make any move on Winchester itself.

For the stories behind the headlines and the latest news on Duke William’s ‘Invasion of England’ read The Saxon Times.

The 1066 Saxon Times Resource book is a compendium of all the leading stories of 1066 available as a downloadable and photocopiable classroom resources, including quizzes to test your knowledge, and is available from The Saxon Times and TES.

 

The Saxon Times

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