There is much more to 1066 than ‘the bigger picture’

The Saxon Times seeks to provide that important newspaper’s view of 1066.

World Book Day 2017

A compilation of The Saxon Times created to celebrate World Book Day. Read the Stories behind the Headlines

The Saxon Times was written to bring 1066 alive with the stories behind the headlines, ‘eye witness reports’ that explores life in 1066.

 

Eadwine of Christ Church, Canterbury, Editor The Saxon Times 1060 to 1066, writes:

‘I would like to thank my good friend William of Poitiers for all his help and support in writing this newspaper, he was a valuable source of information and privy to most of the decisions of Duke William himself.  William of Jumièges also proved to be a reasonably reliable source although he was limited in his capacity to travel because of his great age. Our discussions about the events of the day and their jottings and scribblings served me well when it came to write up my copy. I wish them both every success when they both come to write up their books on ‘The Deeds of Duke William’.

Despite keeping ‘immaculate’ records for both King Harold and Duke William there is occasionally some confusion as to the actual day or dates when these tumultuous events occurred. Everybody seemed to work to a different calendar and sometimes there was a discrepancy or difference of opinion for which I apologise. Even the best of us can forget which day it is!

I must also thank my colleagues who followed the campaigns of King Harold and Duke William, sometimes in great personal danger. Alfgar of Peterborough and Eadgar of West Minster were given leave of absence from their monasteries to record the events of 1066 for posterity. Eadgar became Court Correspondent and Alfgar followed the northern campaigns before we all joined up together at the Battle of Senlac Hill.

I do hope that you enjoy reading The Saxon Times. We will not see the like of it again.’

1066 is the stuff of legends and uncorroborated tales which allow a story to be woven as a best guess or a more than likely scenario.

There are only a few dates that than can be conformed categorically and often there is a discrepancy or a difference of opinion and sometimes pure conjecture as to when the events happened and I have attempted to draw together a timescale that meets the facts and the logistics of moving armies around Saxon England.

The main problem is that the two main chroniclers, William of Poitiers and William of Jumièges, both wrote their respective ‘books’ some years after 1066. The bulk of the writing of William of Poitiers’ ‘Gesta Guillelmi’ probably took place between 1071 and 1077 and William of Jumièges’ Gesta Normannorum Ducum (Deeds of the Dukes of the Normans) was most likely finished in the year of his death in 1070. With no internet access, dictaphones, laptops or tablets it is unsurprising that the dates may be out.

The Saxon Times is a compilation of the available historical information from a wide variety of sources that include relevant books, magazines, journals, television, radio and of course the internet. Where dates cannot be pinpointed accurately, they have been included as summary of events that provide some historical context to 1066. I must thank the eminent historians and scholars  whose books provided much of the detail for The Saxon Times and the Medievalist.net, and all their contributors, whose valuable research provided background reading for additional news items.

Summary

There is more to that tumultuous year than the political intrigues and family betrayals that led to the Battle of Hastings and so beloved of television productions.

The Battles of Fulford, Stamford Bridge and Hastings, between Vikings, Anglo-Saxons and Normans, are the stuff that every student knows. King Harold’s epic marches are part of our folklore and can be read in any history book. Old facts dressed up as new facts, revelations and interpretations that serve to create a vision of an official history are unchallenged. despite the many pages written that create a far more accurate picture of history.

But there is much more to history than ‘the bigger picture’ and The Saxon Times seeks to provide that important newspaper’s view of 1066.

The use of a newspaper style to record historic events enables a more inclusive look at 1066

Secret Service

Many of the troubles of modern day society are mirrored throughout 1066 with enough examples of invasion, terrorist acts and subjugation for comparison. That fateful year also can also be contemplated and argued as a lesson in business strategy and administration. 1066 is right on so many different fronts.

In writing The Saxon Times some fun stuff was added too; adverts, medical pages, cooking pages and a few insights from the ‘people’. Events such as the report by the BBC that the ‘Battle of Hastings sword failed to sell at auction’ and ‘the discovery at Lewes of the skeletal remains of a man believed to have been injured at the battle’ are all be woven into the fabric of the paper.

The use of a newspaper style to record historic events allows a more introspective view of the circumstances and, together with ‘expert’ comments, enables a more inclusive look at 1066.

The Saxon Times forms an important link in the history of 1066 for KS3.

The newspaper is look at how the events of 1066 may have been reported and records ‘eye-witness’ reports of the events surrounding the death of Edward the Confessor, the coronation of King Harold II, the events led to the Battle of Hastings, 14th October 1066 and the subsequent conquest of England through the eyes of The Saxon Times reporters.

The Saxon Times addresses key skills in interpretation, evaluation and explanation of the changes that occurred in 1066 Anglo-Saxon England.

 

The Saxon Times is written to allow students to:

  • Understand the history of 1066 in a coherent and chronological order
  • Identify the strategies and key personnel that influenced events of 1066
  • Provide a wider knowledge of Anglo-Saxon England, Normandy, Europe and the wider world in the context of 1066
  • Evaluate the political alliances and understand how decisions were effected and the cause and effect of these decisions on the events of 1066
  • Contrast and compare Norman and Anglo-Saxon Society
  • Enable wider discussion, contrasting arguments and interpretation of the events of 1066
  • Compare the events of 1066 to current 21st century topics

 

There is the opportunity to reflect upon:

  • Norman and Anglo-Saxon politics
  • Norman and Anglo-Saxon strategies
  • The claimants to the English throne
  • The Battles of Fulford and Stamford Bridge
  • The Battle of Hastings
  • The conquest of England
  • Duke William’s advance on London

 

Extension work includes the opportunity to:

  • Create their own newspaper
  • Write articles for The Saxon Times
  • Write the stories behind the headlines
  • Create advertisements for employment, everyday items, recipes and medicinal cures
  • Imagine life as a Norman or Anglo-Saxon, a noble, a soldier or a peasant.

Some Suggested Overarching Key Enquires:

  • Why did the Normans win the Battle of Hastings?
  • Who were the claimants to the English Throne?
  • Why did Duke William take the long route to London?
  • Why did Duke William need the blessing of the Pope?
  • What was the timeline for the Battle of Hastings?
  • What was the timeline for Duke William’s advance on London?

Resources

The Saxon Times is available in individual editions, for wall display and classroom handouts, and each issue is a brief summary of the day’s Saxon Times news from 1066  as it happened with editorial, comment, features, foreign news, and special editions to bring the events to life.

The Saxon Times is also available as an A4 size paperback, published by Bretwalda Books, with the full stories behind the headlines for the whole year.

Resources are available through TES Resources and by mail order from History Walks.

www.1066haroldsway.co.uk

 

This article was first published on Linked In 22nd February 2017

Treacherous Tostig Tells Tales

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HASTINGS, NORMAN IN ALL BUT NAME

Hastings and its port remain firmly in the control of the Bishop of Fécamp with much Norman influence over this Saxon town. There is a fair bit of comings and goings between what appear to be close-cropped and gaunt ‘monks’. They keep to themselves and spend their time by riding and walking the immediate countryside.

I learnt that Duke William heard of Edward’s death and Harold’s coronation from Tostig, the King’s brother, of all people.

DUKE WILLIAM IS IN AN ALMIGHTY STOMP

“They say William went white with anger, the blood drained from his face. He was speechless and no one dared approach him – all too afraid of his rage. All I’ve heard is that William is sending a messenger to the King. What’s going on between the King and William, nobody knows.”

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