Celebrate Tonight For Tomorrow We Fight

Issue 37

The Army began to arrive at the campsite from early this morning.

The vanguard crossed the Appledore Estuary at Sedlescombe and are in good shape. The bulk of the army came by Vine Hall, following the old trackways. It took longer but it avoided the estuary.

It is the English custom to pass the night, drinking and singing, and without sleep. They say that it takes the mind of the fyrdmen away from thoughts of the morrow.

Axes are being sharpened, leather bottles filled.

There is much talk of past campaigns and victories to motivate and energise the forces, especially those who are inexperienced.

Many went up to the ridge at Senlac. Across the valley was the Norman camp. It did not seem as big as our camp and gave many of the troops a lift, especially those first-timers.

The Norman camp seemed quiet and on the breeze, could be heard chanting, chanting like you would hear in church.

There were a few laughs amongst the Anglo-Saxon ranks “if they’re confessing their sins already they must think that they’re going to die.

Tomorrow, we’ll help them on their way” said one wag which raised more laughter.

This issue of The Saxon Times is included in the 1066 Saxon Times Resource book:

www.1066thesaxontimes.com

It Will All Be Over by Christmas

Issue 35

There are rumours abounding, spread by those who know the area well, that Senlac is key.

As Earl of Wessex, Harold is aware that the ground around Senlac is hilly and far from ideal for the cavalry that reports suggest make up much of the Norman forces.

If Harold can hold the Senlac ridge, the Norman forces will be bottled up in Hastings for the winter. With William finding it difficult to feed his army in the bad weather and prone to disease, the invasion will be finished before it has really started.

It will all be over by Christmas

This issue of The Saxon Times is included in the 1066 Saxon Times Resource book:

www.1066thesaxontimes.com

The Saxon Times

Cover V2

Anglo-Saxon England and the Norman Conquest, 1060-66

 

The Saxon Times looks at how the events of 1066 may have been reported by an English newspaper and takes a chronological, topical and contemporary view of the tumultuous events that surround the Norman Conquest of England as they unfolded and appeared to its readers through the ‘eye-witnesses’ reports of the Saxon Times reporters.

By the time of the Norman Conquest, England had been Anglo-Saxon for 600 years but the death of King Edward the Confessor (1042–66) and the subsequent events that led to the Battle of Hastings changed England forever.

When King Edward the Confessor died in January 1066 nobody could have foreseen the year of bloodshed and mayhem that would take place. Everything seemed settled and peaceful.

England had developed a strong government, a prosperous economy and extensive trade links across the North Sea and the Channel.

A strict social system was headed by the aristocracy with most Anglo-Saxons ‘peasant farmers’, who in return for protection from a lord, owed him service such as military service in return for land to farm.

This military service had created a militia ‘the fyrd’ for defence of the realm which had finally provided some peace from Viking invasion and was one of the reasons that England had such a well-organised government.

The succession crisis of 1066, following the death of King Edward the Confessor meant that once again greedy, envious foreign eyes were being cast toward England.

Invasion was not far off.

The Saxon times is available from all good bookshops, the internet, Amazon

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History Walks

Learning outcomes

· How Anglo-Saxon society worked

· How Harold Godwinson became king of England

· Why other people also claimed the throne of England

· What happened in 1066: the year of the Norman invasion.

The Saxon Times aims to:

· Inspire curiosity to know more about the past

· Increase knowledge of and understanding about 1066

· Understand how people’s lives have shaped the nation

The Saxon Times will:

· Extend knowledge of the year 1066

· Identify the significant events of 1066 in chronological order

· Help develop perspective and argument

· Help weigh the available evidence

· Help understand the complexity of people’s lives and the relationships between different groups