Norman Earls reject Union with England

Blog ST 28 March 17

Why did Duke William want a Papal Blessing?  (Saxon Times Issue 10)

If you were Brother Ealdred in 1066, what you be your cure for Randulf’s wife’s headaches? (Saxon Times Issue 9)

 

Full details of this and other stories of 1066 are reported in The Saxon Times.

The Saxon Times and The Saxon Times classroom resources are available from TES and History Walks

www.tes.com

www.1066thesaxontimes.com

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Classroom Resources to make 1066 Fun

1066 The King’s Games

The Saxon Times King’s Games have been devised to give an idea of the timescales for the major events of that tumultuous year, 1066, in a fun and entertaining format.

They present the story of 1066 as a board game from the Death of King Edward the Confessor, the coronation of King Harold II, preparation for war to the Battle of Hastings. King William’s game includes his progress through southern England to his coronation on 25th December 1066.

They are ideal activities to introduce the concept of 1066, reinforce learning and/or as an end of term activity.

Each game is an A3 size pdf. file and will be e-mailed to you on proof of purchase.

For more information or to buy, CLICK HERE

The King’s Games are also available through TES.

Kings Game Harold II            King William Game

The Saxon Times Resources

Tne Saxon Times is available as individual A3 posters to record the events of 1066 through the eyes of The Saxon Times reporters.

They aim to inspire curiosity to know more about 1066 and expand and develop knowledge and understanding of Britain’s past.

Each issue reports the major headlines of the day with comment, advertisements and maps as appropriate.

The A3 posters are educational, make ideal wall displays and meet the needs of the National Curriculum for History Key Stages 1 and 2 programmes of study

For more information or to buy, CLICK HERE

The Saxon Times posters are also available through TES.

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The use of a newspaper style to record historic events enables a more inclusive look at 1066

Secret Service

Many of the troubles of modern day society are mirrored throughout 1066 with enough examples of invasion, terrorist acts and subjugation for comparison. That fateful year also can also be contemplated and argued as a lesson in business strategy and administration. 1066 is right on so many different fronts.

In writing The Saxon Times some fun stuff was added too; adverts, medical pages, cooking pages and a few insights from the ‘people’. Events such as the report by the BBC that the ‘Battle of Hastings sword failed to sell at auction’ and ‘the discovery at Lewes of the skeletal remains of a man believed to have been injured at the battle’ are all be woven into the fabric of the paper.

The use of a newspaper style to record historic events allows a more introspective view of the circumstances and, together with ‘expert’ comments, enables a more inclusive look at 1066.

The Saxon Times forms an important link in the history of 1066 for KS3.

The newspaper is look at how the events of 1066 may have been reported and records ‘eye-witness’ reports of the events surrounding the death of Edward the Confessor, the coronation of King Harold II, the events led to the Battle of Hastings, 14th October 1066 and the subsequent conquest of England through the eyes of The Saxon Times reporters.

The Saxon Times addresses key skills in interpretation, evaluation and explanation of the changes that occurred in 1066 Anglo-Saxon England.

 

The Saxon Times is written to allow students to:

  • Understand the history of 1066 in a coherent and chronological order
  • Identify the strategies and key personnel that influenced events of 1066
  • Provide a wider knowledge of Anglo-Saxon England, Normandy, Europe and the wider world in the context of 1066
  • Evaluate the political alliances and understand how decisions were effected and the cause and effect of these decisions on the events of 1066
  • Contrast and compare Norman and Anglo-Saxon Society
  • Enable wider discussion, contrasting arguments and interpretation of the events of 1066
  • Compare the events of 1066 to current 21st century topics

 

There is the opportunity to reflect upon:

  • Norman and Anglo-Saxon politics
  • Norman and Anglo-Saxon strategies
  • The claimants to the English throne
  • The Battles of Fulford and Stamford Bridge
  • The Battle of Hastings
  • The conquest of England
  • Duke William’s advance on London

 

Extension work includes the opportunity to:

  • Create their own newspaper
  • Write articles for The Saxon Times
  • Write the stories behind the headlines
  • Create advertisements for employment, everyday items, recipes and medicinal cures
  • Imagine life as a Norman or Anglo-Saxon, a noble, a soldier or a peasant.

Some Suggested Overarching Key Enquires:

  • Why did the Normans win the Battle of Hastings?
  • Who were the claimants to the English Throne?
  • Why did Duke William take the long route to London?
  • Why did Duke William need the blessing of the Pope?
  • What was the timeline for the Battle of Hastings?
  • What was the timeline for Duke William’s advance on London?

Resources

The Saxon Times is available in individual editions, for wall display and classroom handouts, and each issue is a brief summary of the day’s Saxon Times news from 1066  as it happened with editorial, comment, features, foreign news, and special editions to bring the events to life.

The Saxon Times is also available as an A4 size paperback, published by Bretwalda Books, with the full stories behind the headlines for the whole year.

Resources are available through TES Resources and by mail order from History Walks.

www.1066haroldsway.co.uk

 

This article was first published on Linked In 22nd February 2017

Treacherous Tostig Tells Tales

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HASTINGS, NORMAN IN ALL BUT NAME

Hastings and its port remain firmly in the control of the Bishop of Fécamp with much Norman influence over this Saxon town. There is a fair bit of comings and goings between what appear to be close-cropped and gaunt ‘monks’. They keep to themselves and spend their time by riding and walking the immediate countryside.

I learnt that Duke William heard of Edward’s death and Harold’s coronation from Tostig, the King’s brother, of all people.

DUKE WILLIAM IS IN AN ALMIGHTY STOMP

“They say William went white with anger, the blood drained from his face. He was speechless and no one dared approach him – all too afraid of his rage. All I’ve heard is that William is sending a messenger to the King. What’s going on between the King and William, nobody knows.”

Never miss The Saxon Times.

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The Saxon Times and The Saxon Times classroom resources are available from TES and History Walks

www.tes.com

www.1066haroldsway.co.uk

www.1066thesaxontimes.com

There was singing and dancing and great rejoicing

Read the stories behind the headlines, Read The Saxon Times

Eadgar Of West Minster, The Saxon Times Court Correspondent, continues to review recent issues of The Saxon Times

5th January 1066

Edward, King of England 1042 – 1066

It has been announced with great regret that King Edward, known as ‘The Confessor’, died peacefully in his sleep this morning. He served his country well. Tomorrow will be a national day of mourning. It is expected that his funeral service will take place tomorrow in West Minster Abbey.

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Political Comment.

I hope that I am not speaking out of turn but I have grave doubts about the future of our beloved England. Will the King’s childlessness ultimately lead to conflict? Will we have the strength and power to resist invasion from William, from Hardrada or from both?

6th January 1066

At The Witan Today By Our Political Correspondent Cenred of Ely

Today the Witan, was assembled to discuss the succession. With little hesitation or deliberation, they confirmed the identity of the new King of England.

Long Live King Harold II

King Harold Crowned King of England

On this day of Epiphany and with great ceremony before all the assembled nobles, King Harold II was crowned King of England, by Archbishop Stigand. The multitude’s former sombre mood was replaced with great rejoicing, fires were lit and there was singing and dancing that looked as if it would continue far into the night.

Long Live King Harold II

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For details of stockists of The Saxon Times visit History Walks at: www.1066haroldsway.co.uk

The Saxon Times and The Saxon Times Classroom Resources are available from History Walks and from TES:  www.tes.com

www.1066thesaxontimes.com