What did Tostig do in 1066?

Jan 24

 

Tostig, King Harold’s brother, was given everything from the plum orchards of Plumstede to Earl of Northumbria but he always wanted more and eventually he turned upon his brother to disastrous effect and split the Godwin family apart.

You can identify and examine the important role that Tostig played in the events of 1066 through the pages of The Saxon Times.

If Tostig’s animosity to his brother could have been diffused would the outcome of 1066 have changed?

 

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Treacherous Tostig Tells Tales

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HASTINGS, NORMAN IN ALL BUT NAME

Hastings and its port remain firmly in the control of the Bishop of Fécamp with much Norman influence over this Saxon town. There is a fair bit of comings and goings between what appear to be close-cropped and gaunt ‘monks’. They keep to themselves and spend their time by riding and walking the immediate countryside.

I learnt that Duke William heard of Edward’s death and Harold’s coronation from Tostig, the King’s brother, of all people.

DUKE WILLIAM IS IN AN ALMIGHTY STOMP

“They say William went white with anger, the blood drained from his face. He was speechless and no one dared approach him – all too afraid of his rage. All I’ve heard is that William is sending a messenger to the King. What’s going on between the King and William, nobody knows.”

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There was singing and dancing and great rejoicing

Read the stories behind the headlines, Read The Saxon Times

Eadgar Of West Minster, The Saxon Times Court Correspondent, continues to review recent issues of The Saxon Times

5th January 1066

Edward, King of England 1042 – 1066

It has been announced with great regret that King Edward, known as ‘The Confessor’, died peacefully in his sleep this morning. He served his country well. Tomorrow will be a national day of mourning. It is expected that his funeral service will take place tomorrow in West Minster Abbey.

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Political Comment.

I hope that I am not speaking out of turn but I have grave doubts about the future of our beloved England. Will the King’s childlessness ultimately lead to conflict? Will we have the strength and power to resist invasion from William, from Hardrada or from both?

6th January 1066

At The Witan Today By Our Political Correspondent Cenred of Ely

Today the Witan, was assembled to discuss the succession. With little hesitation or deliberation, they confirmed the identity of the new King of England.

Long Live King Harold II

King Harold Crowned King of England

On this day of Epiphany and with great ceremony before all the assembled nobles, King Harold II was crowned King of England, by Archbishop Stigand. The multitude’s former sombre mood was replaced with great rejoicing, fires were lit and there was singing and dancing that looked as if it would continue far into the night.

Long Live King Harold II

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For details of stockists of The Saxon Times visit History Walks at: www.1066haroldsway.co.uk

The Saxon Times and The Saxon Times Classroom Resources are available from History Walks and from TES:  www.tes.com

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In the defence of the Realm

Read the stories behind the headlines, Read The Saxon Times

a Westminster Abbey Drawing HR - Shaded

Eadgar Of West Minster, The Saxon Times Court Correspondent, takes a look at back at some of the headlines at the start of what has been a tumultuous New Year.

29th December 1065

West Minster Abbey set for Consecration but what should have been a Glorious Day was tinged with sadness.

The crowds that lined the streets, around the new Abbey and the Royal Palace on what should have been a day of great rejoicing, were much subdued.

King Edward, known and loved throughout the land as ‘The Confessor’, did not attend the ceremony. We understand, from a Court bulletin, that the King’s health had been failing for some time and yesterday he was too ill to walk the short distance from the Royal Palace. Inside sources close to the King appear to be greatly concerned and some believe that the King may not have long to live.

Militarily, he has had to rely on Wessex to maintain power but we have all enjoyed the benefit of comparative peace in our time. His death will create a power vacuum unless a strong leader steps forward to become King.

Sources close to the King indicate that there are three candidates who all believe that they have the right of accession and a valid claim to the throne.

As the King grows weaker by the day, and without an heir to succeed him, the achievements of Harold Godwinson cannot be overlooked.

His successes in the defence of the Realm have raised him to a position of such eminence that only his deficiency of royal blood can stand between him and the throne.

 

30th December 1065

It Is A Death Wish

Court Circular, The Palace of West Minster

A Court Bulletin confirms the continued concern for the health of King Edward the Confessor. His wife Edith, who is Harold Godwinson’s sister, and Harold Godwinson have both been constant at his bedside.

According to those close to Harold, King Edward spoke to Earl Godwinson of his fears for the future and said; “I commend my wife and all my kingdom to your care”.

There has been no formal confirmation from the Palace to confirm or deny this statement but it is quite possible that it will influence the Witan in their decision as to the succession.

 

The Struggle for England

The Candidates

Harold Godwinson, Earl of Wessex. Anglo-Saxon.

William of Normandy, Duke of Normandy, Resident of Normandy.

Harold Hardrada, King of Norway, Resident of Norway

 

For details of stockists of The Saxon Times visit History Walks at: www.1066haroldsway.co.uk

The Saxon Times and The Saxon Times Classroom Resources are available from History Walks and from TES: www.tes.com

www.1066thesaxontimes.com

A Most Enjoyable Read

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“A most enjoyable read and will be of great interest to those pupils studying history.”

Yvette Gunther,

Librarian,

Nottingham High School

 

“Thank you for The Saxon Times, such fun and very informative and interesting and great for history teachers at both Secondary and primary level, using extracts for ideas and introductory work.”

Shirley W.

The Saxon Times

A Look at how the events of 1066 may have been reported by an English newspaper – with a little interference from the Normans

This book takes a novel and very different look at the tumultuous events of the Norman Conquest of England in 1066.

Instead of being written as history, the book takes the form of a series of facsimile pages from a contemporary newspaper reporting on events as they unfolded and appeared to contemporary people.

When King Edward the Confessor died in January 1066 nobody can have foreseen the year of bloodshed and mayhem that would take place. Everything seemed settled and peaceful.

But very soon it became obvious that greedy, envious foreign eyes were being cast toward England. Invasion was not far off.

Follow what happened through the pages of the Saxon Times, a uniquely English look at what happened in that momentous year through the ‘eye-witnesses’ reports of the Saxon Times reporters.

Brother Ealdred’s Remedies for all your Ailments

June 1066

Brother Ealdred

Brother Ealdred of Malmsbury offers a wide variety of cures for dozens of medical problems, as described in the ‘Lacnunga’, with simple ointments, salves, drinks or remedies made up of a few ingredients. Occasionally, a prayer or chant is all that is needed to return one to full health.

 

Dear Brother Ealdred

Our eldest daughter is 14 years old and is forever rubbing her eyes. She’s made them sore and they always look red. She looks as if she’s been crying all the time and people are beginning to say that we beat her – but we don’t. We want her to look her best as it’s about time she got married but with her eyes so bad no man will come near her. What can we do?

Hereward

Click to read Brother Ealdred’s reply in The Saxon Times:           Blog logo

 

 

Ask Brother Ealdred

Statements made in The Saxon Times, regarding the advice on herbal and natural remedies, are sourced from the ‘Lacnunga’, a collection of miscellaneous Anglo-Saxon medical texts and prayers.

The advice given by Brother Ealdred is for information purposes only, it is not meant to be a substitute for medical advice or diagnosis provided by your doctor or other medical professionals.

Do not use Brother Ealdred’s advice to diagnose, treat or cure any illness or health condition. If you have, or suspect that you have a medical problem, contact your doctor or health care provider.